| | Advanced Search

 

Monfredo: Former Worcester Public School Member Publishes Book—A professional manual for students and professionals

QCC 50th, Celebrating Students: Ato Howard—A Biomedical Engineering student on the rise

MA Beauty Insider: Pedi Nation – Get the Best Pedicure Ever—A guide to finding a pristine pedi place

Fit for Life: Fail to Plan? Plan to Fail—Plan and prioritize, and you will prevail

Tom Finneran: Running on Envy—America's doctors run the gauntlet of envy

Arthur Schaper: Justina: Still Not Free—The crusade continues

Central MA Up + Comer: Vision Advertising CEO Laura Briere—Meet Central MA's rising stars...

FlyORH: Vote for Worcester in JetBlue Contest—Supporting ORH and JetBlue....

Catch the Moscow Festival Ballet With Your WOO Card—Where will you be WOOing this weekend?

Acclaimed Author Leah Hager Cohen to Give Reading at Holy Cross—Will read from new novel 'No Book but…

 
 

College Admissions: Handling Early Admission Rejection

Monday, December 16, 2013

 

It's not what you want to see but it just might arrive--how to handle early decision rejections as well as deferrals.

For many seniors around the country, early admission returns have begun to roll in. For some, it is a time of exuberance because they have been accepted to their first choice college. But for others, it is a time

of exasperation over deferrals, or worse, disappointment over rejection. However, there are things you can do to soften the disappointment and create the best opportunity for acceptances in the spring.

For Deferred Students 

While this is disappointing, it is important to remember that a deferral is NOT a rejection. It is a good idea to show your continued interest in a few ways now: 

  • Forward updates to colleges when you receive awards, team captain titles, have something published, etc.
  • If a college is you first choice, write a nice note to admissions saying that you were disappointed, but that if you are accepted in the spring, you will attend. This assures the college that you are "yield-able" which is important.
  • Make sure that your guidance office sends new grades when they come out.
  • If you have any new SAT or ACT scores, make sure that you have them sent from the CollegeBoard or ACT as soon as they are available.

 

For Rejected Students 

Handling rejection is never easy. It’s understandable if a student is sad for a few days, but lingering in despair for longer than that is not a good idea. It’s time to focus on the positive, and reassess your strategy. First, post every acceptance you have received on the fridge or somewhere visible. Then, go online and find 3 things that you like, but didn't know about each college where you were accepted. It helps reinforce the positive and keeps you from getting bogged down in the negative.

Second, take a hard look at your college list and regular decision schools. If you have Naviance at your school, review scattergrams and make sure that you are looking at schools where students in your academic range have been accepted in past years. If you don’t have access to scattergams, speak with your guidance counselor or invest in a private college advisor to make sure that your choices are realistic. Books and Web sites that list average GPAs and SAT ranges can be very deceiving, especially for elite schools. I don’t recommend that you use those to gauge your chances. Then, if you discover that you have been shooting too high, it’s time to add some additional backup and reasonable schools to you list. File those apps over your holiday vacation, and make sure that you don’t miss January 1 deadlines. 

Remember this

It’s important to remember that very few students get accepted to ALL their colleges. It is a hard part of the process to be rejected from your top choice college, but often one that ends up being a winning path in life. Many famous people, including news anchors, business moguls and Nobel Laureates were rejected from their first choice college. The Wall St. Journal ran a wonderful piece a few years ago that chronicled several, all of whom attributed their success to where they ended up in college.

Wherever you end up in college, you alone have the power to determine your own happiness and your own success. Going to a big name college is not a guaranteed meal ticket today—in any way shape or form. You can get a great education at most colleges and universities in the U.S. if you seek out the best courses, professors and internships--- and if you are driven to succeed! 

Cristiana Quinn, M.Ed. is the founder of College Admission Advisors, LLC which provides strategic, individual counseling for college-bound students. www.collegeadvisorsonline.com

 

Related Slideshow: Central MA Colleges & Universities with the Highest Student Debt

Seven in 10 college seniors (71%) who graduated last year had student loan debt, with an average of $29,400 per borrower, according to a new report released by the Institute for College Access and Success.

According to the Institute’s Project on Student Debt, the average student debt in Massachusetts is $28,460, but what about the state's individual institutions? Check out the slides below to see the average debt graduates are accruing at colleges and universities in Central Massachusetts. (Not all schools self-reported student debt; if not, they are not in the slideshow). 

Note: All data is based on four-year or above institutions for students graduating in the 2011-2012 academic year. Worcester Polytechnic and University of Massachusetts Medical School are not included in the data below, because they did not report the average debt of their graduates.

Prev Next

#7 Worcester State Univ.

Average Student Debt: $20,449

Percent of Graduates with Debt: 74%

Non-Federal Debt, Percent of Total Debt of Graduates: 20%

Bachelor's Degree Recipients: 861

Full-time Enrollment Fall 2011: 3,901

In-State Tuition and Fees: $7,653

Total Cost of Attendance: $21,585

Percent Pell Grant Recipients: 21%

Prev Next

#6 Clark University

Average Student Debt: $25,175

Percent of Graduates with Debt: 91%

Non-Federal Debt, Percent of Total Debt of Graduates: 15%

Bachelor's Degree Recipients: 539

Full-time Enrollment Fall 2011: 2,218

In-State Tuition and Fees: $37,350

Total Cost of Attendance: $46,200

Percent Pell Grant Recipients: 20%

Prev Next

#5 Holy Cross

Average Student Debt: $26,567

Percent of Graduates with Debt: 55%

Non-Federal Debt, Percent of Total Debt of Graduates: 16%

Bachelor's Degree Recipients: 692

Full-time Enrollment Fall 2011: 2,872

In-State Tuition and Fees: $41,488

Total Cost of Attendance: $54,358

Percent Pell Grant Recipients: 16%

Prev Next

#4 Nichols College

Average Student Debt: $30,890

Percent of Graduates with Debt: 89%

Non-Federal Debt, Percent of Total Debt of Graduates: 29%

Bachelor's Degree Recipients: 278

Full-time Enrollment Fall 2011: 1,116

In-State Tuition and Fees: $30,400

Total Cost of Attendance: $43,315

Percent Pell Grant Recipients: 34%

Prev Next

#3 Assumption College

Average Student Debt: $34,579

Percent of Graduates with Debt: 81%

Non-Federal Debt, Percent of Total Debt of Graduates: 29%

Bachelor's Degree Recipients: 485

Full-time Enrollment Fall 2011: 2,090

In-State Tuition and Fees: $32,545

Total Cost of Attendance: $45,830

Percent Pell Grant Recipients: 18%

Prev Next

#2 Becker College

Average Student Debt: $44,596

Percent of Graduates with Debt: 95%

Non-Federal Debt, Percent of Total Debt of Graduates: 33%

Bachelor's Degree Recipients: 239

Full-time Enrollment Fall 2011: 1,400

In-State Tuition and Fees: $28,490

Total Cost of Attendance: $42,710

Percent Pell Grant Recipients: 48%

Prev Next

#1 Anna Maria College

Average Student Debt: $49,206

Percent of Graduates with Debt: 86%

Non-Federal Debt, Percent of Total Debt of Graduates: 39%

Bachelor's Degree Recipients: 165

Full-time Enrollment Fall 2011: 803

In-State Tuition and Fees: $29,860

Total Cost of Attendance: $42,930

Percent Pell Grant Recipients: 38%

 
 

Related Articles

 

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.




Write your comment...

You must be logged in to post comments.