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Worcester Photographer Troy B. Thompson Captures Beauty in Nature

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

 

Troy B. Thompson, Long Pond, Acadia National Park, Bar Harbor, ME

For Worcester's Troy B. Thompson, photography is an escape. It gives him the ability to unleash his artistic side by performing a seemingly simply act of capturing a moment in nature.

"Being a web designer, I spend more time than I would like indoors," he says. "Photography allows me to be artistic outside of my house or a studio, and it's usually social for me as well. It also gives me the challenge of taking something that already exists and creating my own unique view of it to share with others."

The beauty of photography is that it captures fleeting moments that one can never experience quite the same way again. A picture gives a sense permanence to an ever-changing world and, in doing this, can create a powerful memory that one would not have had otherwise.

"I have a horrible memory," Thompson says jokingly. "Seriously, though, documenting my travels, experiences, and my daughter growing up is very rewarding to me, and I enjoy being able to look over those photographs and relive those times. If other people enjoy my pictures too, that's a bonus to me."

The other beautiful thing about nature is that it's so unpredictable; any given day a photographer can capture a spectacular scene on a whim, a scene that may seem mundane to average eyes, but can inspire awe in many others. It's up to the photographer to make a proper judgment on what is worth his time.

"Nature has always been an important part of my life, plus I enjoy exploring new places and being able to share my experiences with other people," he says.

"I rarely set out with something specific in mind because I don't know what I will find while I'm out. Some photographers will spend days waiting for the right lighting for a specific shot, but since I hike and travel with my family and often don't go to the same place twice, I pretty much have to see something I like, imagine the framing as I get closer, quickly take a photo, and keep on walking," he says explaining his process.

Thompson's ultimate goal is to the make viewer feel like they're there, no matter the emotion it creates. They should be placed in the moment and at the place in question, a task far more difficult to accomplish than it sounds.

"Typically, it's something calming, peaceful, or slightly mysterious that I pass on to the viewer. Other times, it's something I think is fun or silly and I hope they enjoy it as well."

Thompson is not limited to photos of the "outdoors." He also enjoys taking photos of people, especially children; though, even these photos center around the concept of nature to a certain extent. He wants to capture people in "action", or their "natural habitat" so to speak.

"When I do event photography, I much prefer candids than poses so people can get the sense of what it was really like there. Even when photographing children, watching and waiting and capturing their true personality rather than giving them a micro managed pose that I came up with creates much more vivid memories for their parents in the future."

In addition to the work listed above, Thompson is also the creator of the No Evil Project, which was recently featured at Nichols College. This project, centered around using photography to encourage acceptance of the other and the overcoming of traditional stereotypes, is quickly building steam. It shows how photography, like other forms of art, can have an important social significance, if used correctly. He hopes for big things in the future with this project.

"I see the most opportunities, though, with my No Evil Project. My second exhibit has just gone up, other colleges and organizations are talking about doing similar projects to build community and discuss diversity, and now schools are contacting me about doing exhibits, events, and large scale photo shoots to use my art to address bullying," he says of this work.

"It's all new to me, and a great challenge as I learn constantly, but using art to strengthen communities and improve people's lives would be a great way to live."

To learn more about Troy B. Thompson please visit his website or find him on Facebook. To learn more about his No Evil Project please visit its website or find it on Facebook as well.


 

 

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