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Worcester’s Sharon Freed Demonstrates Innate Power of Photography

Tuesday, July 09, 2013

 

Sharon Freed's photography captures a mundane moment and shows its beauty.

Worcester's Sharon Freed is living proof of the value of a hobby and, as such, the ability of any person to gain a hobby at any stage of life. Photography, especially, is particularly suited to this ability. It is not as demanding as, say, learning to paint or draw or to play an instrument, yet it is an art just the same if done correctly, able to arouse similar emotions and feelings in viewers and a sense of satisfaction in the photographer.

Indeed, as she states, arousing emotions in the viewer is Freed's chief goal with her art, no matter which particular feelings they may be.

"I want my photos to be accessible to anyone and everyone who wants to see them. I don’t expect everyone to like my photos, but I hope that the images elicit a strong emotional response from the viewer – even if it’s unfavorable," she remarks.

"I hope the viewer is moved, affected in some way. I want them to walk away with a new and different perspective "

She is a self-taught photographer with a background in non-profit work and politics. Born in Worcester, she attended Brandeis. She began to be attracted to photography as an art while hiking through the breathtaking New England wilderness. Taking a camera on her trips was just an afterthought at first, but she soon began to realize the satisfactory power of the images she was able to capture.

"As I continued hiking and as time went on, I realized how much I enjoyed having the camera in my hands. And with a lot of help and support from family and friends, I’ve been able to learn and explore," states Freed.

"There is something about looking through a camera lens that allows me both the distance and the intimacy with my subject matter."

Making the Commonplace Extraordinary

Freed remarks that many go through life with a sort of "everyday blindness," where they forget and often lose the ability to take a break and "really pay attention to what's going on around" them. This did not happen to Mrs. Freed. Capturing images with a camera helps her defeat this jaded view of the world, allowing her to find the innate beauty in the most seemingly mundane objects. This is especially true with her most recent work.

"I really want to expose what seems commonplace and make it extraordinary. I’m looking to explore how we view broken, discarded objects and how the organic interacts with the artificial," says Sharon. She goes on. "I want to challenge the viewers to see themselves in a different way."

She hopes to continue this important work in the future with the same purpose in mind, but in the process continue to adapt, learn and experiment.

Her photography is already being noticed. Her first solo show will be happening in the fall at the Hanover Theatre. She "couldn't be more thrilled" about the opportunity.

"As an artist, you want to learn new things and hope that your work evolves. I hope I can always be brave enough to make sure my work is authentic," she says.

Of course, it's hard to find anything more authentic than the art of photography. It captures a moment in time, and no one moment in time is the same as any other. And all moments, to the artist, have the potential to be beautiful, even those that seem so average on the surface.

For more information on Sharon Freed and to view her work please visit her website.
 

 

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