Welcome! Login | Register
 

Friday Financial Five - September 19, 2014—A positive report out of the New York…

The Cellar: Two Wines You Should Always Have On Hand—This week’s wines are two bottles you should…

What To Watch For: Patriots vs. Raiders—The Patriots will finally play their home opener…

Attend stART on the Street with Your Woo Card—The weekend is fast approaching, and GoLocalWorcester brings…

Worcester Art Museum Begins Construction on New Access Bridge—Construction has begun on a new accessible walkway…

Dear John: No Affair. And Maybe No Friendship.—Was she wrong to tell her friends?

Davis Advertising Debuts Blog about Marketing to Millennials—Davis Advertising will take an in-depth look at…

BBB Warns Consumers of Online Retailer, shopZoey.com—Better Business Bureau is warning consumers about shopZoey.com,…

Smart Benefits: Are Double-Digit Premium Increases a Thing of the Past?—A new study on employer health benefits from…

College Admissions: Which New England Grads Make 6 Figures?—As more attention from the federal government focuses…

 
 

slides: Central Mass Towns with the Highest Divorce Rates

Monday, April 01, 2013

 

GoLocalWorcester is taking a look at the towns in the region with the highest rates of divorce, based on census data. Massachusetts may have one of the lower rates of divorce in the U.S. but some towns aren’t in it for the long haul.

According to Polly A. Tatum, an experienced Divorce Mediator serving Worcester County, the economy plays a large role in divorce rates, as so a region’s social factors.

A Look at Mass.

According to figures from the Center for Disease Control, the divorce rate per 1,000 population in Massachusetts has risen in the past four years. In 2008, the rate was 2.0, rising to 2.2 the following year. In 2010, 2.5 percent were getting divorced, and in 2011 2.7.

Nationally, there were 2,096,000 marriages in 2010, and the divorce rate was 3.6 per 1,000 population.

Statistics have also reflected regional differences that show that the Bay State’s low rate is similar to the region. Divorce rates are higher than the national average in the Southeast (10.2 per 1,000 men and 11.1 per 1,000 women) and lower in the Northeast (7.2 for men and 7.5 for women). Marriage rates are also higher in the Southeast and lower in the Northeast.

Economic Influence?

Tatum said that while many issues come together in a divorce, the economy plays a part.

“In my opinion, economic factors can play a major role in the demise of a marriage,” she said. “I believe as the economy starts to pull out of this deep recession, divorce rates will continue to climb as opposed to people trying to stay in one household in order to make ends meet.”

Studies have linked economic stability to divorce rates, and Tatum points out that the towns at the top of the list in Central Mass have a varied economic base, some on the lower economic spectrum.

Tatum said that low figures are also being influenced by couples’ decisions to go around a technical divorce. While marriages are happening less often in New England, she sees this trend in her practice.

“I have found in my Divorce Mediation practice that more and more couples are continually seeking alternatives to traditional litigation to save time, money and the stress of a contested divorce process,” Tatum said.

Numbers Across the Nation

The McKinley Irvin firm also features some insightful divorce facts that paint a good picture of how other areas stack up, compared to the Commonwealth. The average length of a marriage that ends in divorce is eight years.

According to the law firm, people wait an average of three years after a divorce to remarry if they remarry at all, and the average age for couples going through their first divorce is 30 years old.

2008 voter data shows that “red” states, have higher divorce rates than “blue” states.

Oklahoma has the highest overall divorce rate at 13.45, followed by Arkansas, which has the second highest rate of divorce in the country at 13.15. Alaska comes in next with a divorce rate of 13.05.

 

Related Articles

 

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.