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Filmmaker Davis to Host Lecture Called “Whose Streets” at Clark

Thursday, March 08, 2018

 

Artist and filmmaker Damon Davis will be at Clark University for a talk about a documentary called “Whose Streets,” which chronicles the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri following the shooting of Michael Brown.

The talk will take place on Thursday, March 22 at 7 p.m. at Razzo Hall. The event is free and open to the public.

Whose Streets

"Whose Streets?" tells the story of the protests from the perspective of the activists who showed up to challenge those who use power to spread fear and hate.

The film premiered at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival and was released to theaters three years after Brown was fatally shot by Ferguson, Missouri police officer Darren Wilson in August 2017; it was praised for its portrayal of activism, with focuses on organizations such as Cop Watch, and the Hands Up movement.

A statement by the co-directors says that the film was made “as tribute to our people—our deeply complex, courageous, flawed, powerful, and ever hopeful people—who dare to dream of brighter days. This is more than a documentary…this is a story we personally lived.”

 

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