| | Advanced Search

 

Monfredo: Former Worcester Public School Member Publishes Book—A professional manual for students and professionals

QCC 50th, Celebrating Students: Ato Howard—A Biomedical Engineering student on the rise

MA Beauty Insider: Pedi Nation – Get the Best Pedicure Ever—A guide to finding a pristine pedi place

Fit for Life: Fail to Plan? Plan to Fail—Plan and prioritize, and you will prevail

Tom Finneran: Running on Envy—America's doctors run the gauntlet of envy

Arthur Schaper: Justina: Still Not Free—The crusade continues

Central MA Up + Comer: Vision Advertising CEO Laura Briere—Meet Central MA's rising stars...

FlyORH: Vote for Worcester in JetBlue Contest—Supporting ORH and JetBlue....

Catch the Moscow Festival Ballet With Your WOO Card—Where will you be WOOing this weekend?

Acclaimed Author Leah Hager Cohen to Give Reading at Holy Cross—Will read from new novel 'No Book but…

 
 

Julia Steiny: Common Core Standards Freak Out Chicken Littles

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

 

It's true: if allowed to survive, the Common Core State Standards would be a massive, necessary, though slow-moving overhaul of American education.

Finalized and welcomed by the education community three years ago, the standards are now starting to trickle into classroom practices, so hackles are up. But somehow the American public has lost the habit of raising questions in a civil manner or asking pointed questions to spark a needed debate. That's for wusses. Better to reach for emotional Uzis -- name-calling, vicious accusations, and rallying cries to kill the Standards dead rather than improve them. This is life in the post-moral culture. Fight first.

At the risk of adding to their current unpopularity, the situation with the CCSS is not unlike that of the Affordable Care Act. Both are messy, flawed, and huge.

But in both cases, they're also necessary and long overdue. I concede their imperfections. They are human-made, after all. But no virtue or value lies in reverting to the bad old days. In the case of the ACA, we've had the most expensive and ineffective healthcare system in the world, which doesn't even reach huge swaths of the population. At least we are headed, however stumbling, towards something better.

In the case of the CCSS, the very purpose of public education in America has been unclear for decades. We've desperately needed a description of "better." CCSS are such a description. They are not curriculum and they're not testing programs. They're just standards -- goals, objectives, targets to sharpen our aim and elevate our hopes for kids. We can't get anywhere if we don't know where we're going.

America is the only developed country without national standards.

All the countries with whom American students are compared have national standards and even national curricula (Finland). Weirdly, national standards are about the only thing those countries' education systems have in common. The Asian countries have their Tiger Mamas and their cram schools and a focus on test scores that makes my skin crawl. The European and Euro-like countries (Australia) have more appealing (to me) national goals and standards that at least mention preparing young people for happy, fulfilling lives. So the comparison countries have highly diverse, but national standards.

Just for the record, if the state of Massachusetts were a county unto itself, it would be at the top of the international rankings, right up there with Singapore. In the 1990s, MA set a high bar for their students and weathered nasty complaints of opponents that sound exactly like the hues and cries voiced now against CCSS. Over the course of years, MA's students' academic performance climbed from middling to the top of the U.S. state rankings, where they have remained for years. MA did not mandate a curriculum; that was up to the locals, just as it is with CCSS. Interestingly, MA just announced it would take a pass, for now, on the CCSS testing program they'd agreed to use. If they can tweak their MCAS, which has served them well, it might remain their testing system. Every state can decide for itself how their kids will meet the new rigorous standards.

Let's back up to the 2001 federal No Child Left Behind law.

NCLB bowed to states' rights and local control by mandating each state develop a standards-and-accountability system. Three states pooled their resources to create the NECAP, bringing the number of unique sets of state standards to a ridiculous 48. With very few exceptions (like MA), states set fairly low expectations. Furthermore, NCLB's strategy was to punish under-performing schools, so most states tried to avoid consequences with pathetically unambitious testing goals. Other than developing very useful data-gathering machinary in each state, NCLB mainly left the education industry confused and defensive.

To dig out of that mess, the National Governors Association and the Chief State School Officers collaborated on the CCSS. They assembled all manner of teachers, boards of education, researchers, institutions of higher education, administrators and business leaders to figure out what a high-school student should know and be able to do. With the end goals in hand, they designed a sequence of grade-by-grade benchmarks to help students reach newly ambitious academic heights, In 2010, the CCSS authors presented their work, in English and Math.

Generally, experts agreed that the standards were good -- more rigorous, more aligned with Higher Education, Business and the emerging economy. Many people, including me, take issue with some of the specifics. (The early-childhood standards need revision.) But let's work on them in isolation. One bad standard does not spoil the lot. Killing off the CCSS initiative will not address specific concerns, never mind improve public education.

How the CCSS plays out in your district or your child's classroom is a local matter. Anyone worried about over-testing needs to take it up with their state, where the problem actually lies.

But stop already with the Chicken Little behavior. CCSS is not the doom of America's kids. Review your lesson on the Baby and the Bathwater, because while we probably need to change some bathwater, this Baby is critical.

Julia Steiny is a freelance columnist whose work also regularly appears at EducationNews.org . She is the founding director of the Youth Restoration Project, a restorative-practices initiative, currently building demonstration projects in Rhode Island. She consults for schools and government initiatives, including regular work for The Providence Plan for whom she analyzes data. For more detail, see juliasteiny.com or contact her at juliasteiny@gmail.com or c/o GoLocalProv, 44 Weybosset Street, Providence, RI 02903.

 

Related Slideshow: 7 Art Galleries To Visit In Central MA

Prev Next

Worcester Art Museum

55 Salisbury Street, Worcester

The Worcester Art Museum, often referred to by its acronym WAM, is the most acclaimed cultural attraction in the city of Worcester. The world famous "classic American museum" contains over 35,000 pieces of artwork spanning over 5,000 years. Currently on display is [remastered]: A reinstallation of the Worcester Art Museum's paintings from the 16th-18th centuries provides a new look at Old Masters.

Prev Next

Worcester Center for Crafts

25 Sagamore Road, Worcester

The Worcester Center for Crafts’ Krikorian Gallery, in conjunction with Worcester State University, is committed to "sustaining craft as a vital part our community" through education, advocacy, and entrepreneurship. They are currently holding its Holiday Festival of Crafts 2013 this weekend.

Prev Next

Fitchburg Art Museum

25 Merriam Parkway, Fitchburg

The Fitchburg Art Museum is one of the cultural treasures of North Central Massachusetts. Though not quite as famous as its cousin to the south, the Worcester Art Museum, the Fitchburg museum still houses an impressive permanent collection of art spanning 5,000 years. Check out their current exhibition: Still Life Lives! - A celebration of the vitality of the still life tradition and its themes of beauty, bounty, darkness, fragility, and fleeting moments, which runs through January 14.

Prev Next

The Sprinkler Factory

38 Harlow Street, Worcester

The Sprinkler Factory is a unique gem in Downtown Worcester and a true center for all the arts. Once a manufacturing plant, the Sprinkler Factory now provides space for individual artists to form their own studios and contains areas for music, dance, and other fun activities. The massive atrium on the second floor in the middle of the complex is available for local artists to show their work. The public is welcome to browse the artists' studios and galleries. An upcoming exhibition entitled Indoor Games , runs from December 7 through January 25, captures the spirit of creativity during the winter months.

Prev Next

Boulder Art Gallery

960 Main Street, Fitchburg

Since its opening in 2008 by founders by Ann and Peter Capodagli, the Boulder Art Gallery has been committed to showing original and vintage paintings, photographs, prints and sculptures from the region's most talented artists. A true variety of work from both new and established artists is on display in a multitude of mediums and styles; check out oils, acrylics, watercolors and pastels. Many pieces are also available for purchase.

Prev Next

Aurora Gallery and GArtH Gallery (ArtsWorcester)

660 Main Street; 657 Main Street, Worcester

The Aurora Gallery and the “GArtH” Gallery of Art at the Hadley are run by the organization ArtsWorcester, and both show the work of local artists, many of whom are members of the group. For a list of current and upcoming exhibits, click here and here.

Prev Next

Davis Art Gallery

44 Portland Street, Worcester

Since its founding in 2006, the Davis Art Gallery has made it its mission to promote the Worcester art community and create awareness of the local creative culture. One of the ways the gallery does this is by showing the work of local artists in a great variety of different mediums. Currently, you can see an exhibit by Emily and Robb Sandagata; Unearthed, which runs through February 7th.

 
 

Related Articles

 

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.




Commenting is not available in this channel entry.