Welcome! Login | Register
 

Sunday Political Brunch: Trump’s First Year Report Card—January 21, 2018—Sunday Political Brunch: Trump's First Year Report Card…

Worcester Man Sentenced to Life in Prison for 2015 Murder—Worcester Man Sentenced to Life in Prison for…

Fit For Life: Follow Through - Stick to Your Goals!—Fit For Life: Follow Through - Stick to…

Chamber of Commerce to Host StartUp Worcester Open House—Chamber of Commerce to Host StartUp Worcester Open…

10 Great Things to do in Worcester This Weekend - January 19, 2018—10 Great Things to do in Worcester This…

Massachusetts Loses 500 Jobs in December—Massachusetts Loses 500 Jobs in December

Finneran: Bad Moon Rising—Finneran: Bad Moon Rising

Friday Financial Five – January 19, 2018—Friday Financial Five – January 19, 2018

Man Arrested After Robbing Woman at Knifepoint in Worcester—Man Arrested After Robbing Woman at Knifepoint in…

See Where Massachusetts Ranks Among Best States to Retire—See Where Massachusetts Ranks Among Best States to…

 
 

MA Ranks Poorly in U.S. for Protecting Kids From Tobacco

Thursday, December 14, 2017

 

Massachusetts is ranked 35th in the country when it comes to funding tobacco control programs, according to the 2017 Broken Promises to Our Children report released on Wednesday.

According to the report, Massachusetts is spending $3.7 million this year on tobacco prevention and cessation programs, which is only 5.6 percent of the $66.9 million recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Massachusetts can be a leader again in fighting tobacco by increasing funding for tobacco prevention and cessation programs and raising the tobacco age to 21. As Massachusetts itself has shown, we can win the fight against tobacco and make the next generation tobacco-free, but Massachusetts needs to keep doing its part to help us achieve these goals. Raising the state’s tobacco age to 21 would be an excellent step forward,” said Matthew L. Myers, President of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

Tobacco in Massachusetts

In Massachusetts, 7.7 percent of high school students smoke, and 2,500 kids become regular smokers each year.

Tobacco use claims 9,300 Massachusetts lives and costs the state $4.1 billion in health care bills annually.

Tobacco companies spend $117.1 million each year to market their products in Massachusetts – more than 30 times what the state spends on tobacco prevention. 

Massachusetts will collect $884 million in revenue this year from the 1998 tobacco settlement and tobacco taxes, but will spend only 0.4 percent of the money on tobacco prevention programs.

Broken Promises to Our Children Report

The report was released by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Americans for Nonsmokers’ Rights and Truth Initiative.

 

Related Articles

 

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.

 

X

Stay Connected — Free
Daily Email