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NEW: Mass State Rep. Binienda Pushes For Tighter Marijuana Laws

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

 

Massachusetts State Representative John J. Binienda (D-Worcester) advocated for numerous crime-related bills at public hearings last week on Beacon Hill, including 2 that will enforce stricter regulations on marijuana and other Class D drugs.

The bills were originally filed in January, and were up for discussion at a public hearing last week.

The six bills went before the Legislature’s Joint Committee on the Judiciary at the State House. They ranged from legislation that would ban the sale of synthetic marijuana to preventing drug dealing near certain recreational facilities to bills that promote increased police officer safety when dealing with suspects or executing search warrants.

Synthetic marijuana

“Allowing this product to be sold in the Commonwealth is essentially legalizing a drug that is by all accounts considerably more dangerous than marijuana,” said Binienda of the banning of synthetic marijuana, sometimes called “K-2” or “Spice.”

“For almost 30 years as a legislator, public safety has and will always be a top priority for me, and I will continue to advocate for initiatives that increase police officer safety and assist in their endeavors to prevent crime, keep drugs away from our kids and dealers off the streets, and generally try to make our communities safer,” Binienda said.

If the bills receive favorable feedback from the Judiciary committee, they will be scheduled for an initial vote of engrossment by the entire House.
 

 

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