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slides: 8 Great Ways to Celebrate Black History Month

Friday, February 07, 2014

 

Black History Month, or National African American History Month, is an annual celebration of achievements by black Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of African Americans in U.S. history. Since 1976, every U.S. president has officially designated the month of February as Black History Month. Here are 8 Great Ways around Central Massachusetts or beyond to enjoy the chance to share in this rich history.

 

Related Slideshow: Black History Month Activities

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Black Indians: An American Story

Black Indians: An American Story will be shown at the MOSAIC Multi-Cultural Complex as part of OurStory Black Culture Series. Black Indians: An American Story, explores the issue of racial identity among Native and African Americans. This in depth documentary examines the coalescence of these two groups in American history. Narrated by James Earl Jones, Black Indians is produced and directed by the award-winning Native American production company Rich-Heape Films. The film will be shown Friday, February 7th at 5:30 at 162 41 Piedmont Street in Worcester. For more information on the film, http://richheape.com/black-indians-american-story.htm.

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The Black History Month Concert

The Congregational Church of Westborough will host an uplifting afternoon of music, once again celebrating African American History. The Black History Month Concert has become an annual event among the joint churches led by choir director Curtis Richardson. The concert will be held on Sunday, February 9th, at 4pm. Spirituals and gospel music will celebrate and honor Black History Month. Child care will be provided. At the conclusion of the event there will be a reception downstairs with refreshments. Tickets are $10 at the door. It’s open to the public and all are welcome. For more information visit uccwestboro.org.

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Bob Marley Birthday Bash

Celebrate the life and music of Robert Nesta Marley! OurStory Presentations presents the Bob Marley Birthday Bash 2014 at Worcester Public Library. The Birthday Bash includes a video documentary on the life of Bob Marley, live music featuring Worcester’s finest performers, drumming and sample Authentic Jamaican Food. Fun for all ages! Saturday, February 8th, 2014 from 1pm to 5 pm at the Worcester Public Library, 3 Salem Square.

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Dark Girls

Dark Girls will be shown at the Worcester Public Library as part of the “OurStory Black Culture” Series. Dark Girls is a fascinating and controversial film that goes underneath the surface to explore the prejudices dark-skinned women face throughout the world. It explores the roots of classism, racism and the lack of self-esteem within a segment of cultures that span from America to the most remote corners of the globe. The showing will be on Wednesday, February 12 at 5:30 pm at the Worcester Public Library, 3 Salem Square.

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Free African Music Series

A free music series will be every Thursday in February. Gallery of African Art and Coffeelands Cafe will be adding to the international flavor of downtown Clinton by showcasing a variety of musicians specializing in and inspired by traditional AfricanMusic. Featured musicians include:

  • Feb. 6 Yacouba Sissoko | Kora
  • Feb. 13 Balla Kouyate | Balafon
  • Feb. 20 Banning Eyre | African guitar styles
  • Feb. 27 Issa Coulibaly | Djembe

 

An hour prior to the performances, featured musicians will be giving lecture/demonstrations at Gallery of African Art on 62 High St, Clinton MA. Lecture/demonstrations 6:00-6:45. Music Performances 7:00-8:30 at Coffeelands Café, 54 High Street, Clinton MA. Call/email Zach for info, 978-265-4345,      zcombs@galleryofafricanart.org.

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Geoffrey Canada at The Hanover Theatre

In his 20-plus years with Harlem Children’s Zone, Inc (HCZ), Geoffrey Canada has become nationally recognized for his pioneering work helping children and families in Harlem and as a passionate advocate for education reform. The work of Mr. Canada and HCZ has become a national model and the subject of many profiles in the national media including “The Oprah Winfrey Show” and “60 Minutes”. In 2009, President Barack Obama announced plans to replicate this visionary’s HCZ model in 20 other cities across the nation, including Worcester! Worcester Connects Distinguished Speaker Series presents Geoffrey Canada on March 20th at 7PM are $30 and $40, depending on seating location. 10% discount available for members, corporate partners, kids, students, and WOO Card holders. Please call the box office at 877.571.SHOW (7469) for more information.

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The Museum of African American History

Museum of African American History, in Boston, is dedicated to preserving, conserving and accurately interpreting the contributions of African Americans in New England from the colonial period through the 19th century. In Boston, enjoy two National Historical Landmarks, the African Meeting House and Abiel Smith School located at 46 Joy Street, Beacon Hill. Call 617.720.2991. Admission is $5.00. For more information visit: www.maah.org

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Black Heritage Trail Walking Tours

Walk in the footsteps of the first Africans as they arrived in Boston as slaves. By 1705, there were 400 slaves in Boston and the beginning of the black community in the North End. By the end of The American Revolution, there were more free black people than slaves and by 1790, Massachusetts was the only state in the union without slaves. By 1800 some 1,100 Black Bostonians made up one of the largest free African-American communities in North America.The Black Heritage Walking Tour explores the history of that 19th century African American community in Beacon Hill. For more information or a clickable self-guided map. http://www.nps.gov/boaf/planyourvisit/index.htm

 
 

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