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NEW: MA #2 For Education in Nation—EdWeek

Thursday, January 10, 2013

 

Massachusetts ranked 2nd for education in the 2013 Quality Counts report cards from Education Week and the Editorial Projects in Education Research Center released on Thursday.

The Bay State scored 84.1 on the study's 100-point scale, earning the Commonwealth a grade of B. Maryland finished in the top spot for the fifth year in a row with an 87.5, earning the top grade of B+. Nationally, the U.S. earned a C+.

The Ed Week report takes into account a broad range of factors when determining each state's grade including strong and positive peer interactions, a sense of safety and security, and school disciplinary policies and practices.

“For the past couple decades, education reform has concentrated on the obviously academic factors that define schooling—curriculum, assessments, accountability, and teachers,” said Christopher B. Swanson, Vice President of Editorial Projects in Education, the nonprofit organization that publishes Education Week.

“While these issues are clearly important, there is growing agreement that a school’s broader climate profoundly affects student achievement and serves as a precursor for effective instruction, deep engagement in learning, and academic success.”

 

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