Welcome! Login | Register
 

Angiulo: Bringing Both Sides of Local Disputes to the Negotiating Table—Local government may have the lowest profile of…

Smart Benefits: Serve Up Wellness for the Holidays—The holiday season may bring good cheer

Holy Cross Rolls Nichols, 101-70, Improves to 3-0—Holy Cross improves to 3-0 on the season.

Jones, Bunbury Carry Revolution To Crucial Road Win—Jermaine Jones and Teal Bunbury collected a goal…

Patriots Have The Wright Stuff—Shut Down Detroit 34-9—The New England Patriots got two touchdowns from…

New England’s Booziest States—New England is known for it's love of…

Sharks Can’t Find Net, Lose 1-0 In Hershey—The Worcester Sharks have now dropped five straight…

Monfredo: A Magical Night … as Students Showed Off Their Talent—The arts are an integral part of the…

Fit For Life: Don’t be a turkey…—It's Thanksgiving, but I am going to stick…

Holy Cross vs Georgetown Football Preview—Holy Cross closes out their season on the…

 
 

Harvard #2: Central MA’s Best Communities

Friday, June 29, 2012

 

Harvard

# 2 Harvard is home to the Fruitlands Museum, which was originally the Harvard Shaker Village. Originally a farming community, the town remains rural, with woods, small rolling hills, fields and wetlands.

The town also has several apple orchards and a highly regarded school system.

Harvard is one of only two communities to claim the top rank in two categories: education and economic condition.  The town also ranks 10th for arts and culture, but it is 70th for affordability.  

Photo courtesy of Andrew Watson

Harvard by the numbers

Established: 1732
Population: 6,520
Median household income: $141,274
Median housing price: $586,000

2012 Best Communities rankings
Overall ranking: 2
Affordability ranking: 70
Education ranking: 1
Economic condition ranking: 1
Safety ranking: 14
Arts & Culture ranking: 10
Restaurant ranking: 52

 

History in a nutshell:
The town of Harvard was home to many various utopian and new-thought societies. Transcendentalist Amos Alcott, with young daughter Louisa May Alcott, and Charles Lane attempted to create a socialist farm called the Fruitlands, which only last seven months. In 1905 the town became home to the Harvard Shaker Village--a utopian society that advocated celibacy, self-denial and communal ownership of property. Another movement appeared in 1918 when Harvard resident Henry George attempted to create a single tax zone in the town which survived only 20 years.

Famous residents:  

Amos Bronson Alcott – teacher, writer Louisa May Alcott – novelist, daughter of Amos Alcott
Tabitha Babbitt – tool maker
Adam Dziewonski – geophysicist
Jonathan Edwards – musician
Fannie Farmer – cookbook author
Lynn Jennings – Olympic runner
Charles Lane –Transcendentalist
Ann Lee – Shaker founder
Keir O'Donnell – Australian actor
Clara Endicott Sears – founder of Fruitlands Museum
Ted Sizer – educational reform leader

Famous residents source: Wikipedia
Additional reporting by Grace Fenton
 

 

Related Articles

 

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.