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NEW: WPI Creates an App to Deal with Boston’s Potholes

Monday, April 30, 2012

 

A Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) professor has come up with an innovative way to help the city of Boston find its worst potholes.

Fabio Carrera, a professor and global program manager with WPI’s Interdisciplinary and Global Studies Division, introduced Street Bump, a smartphone app that detects potholes while you drive. He did it in concert with Mayor Thomas Menino’s Office of New Urban Mechanics.

The Bump captures a second's worth of data and attaches it to the GPS location. When you’re done driving, you press a button to upload the bump locations to a server running a program that recognizes the potholes. Once the same pothole is detected by three different motorists, it is placed on the list to be fixed.

The app cost the city $80,000 and can be downloaded for free starting in May.


 

 

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